A HIDDEN TOXICITY IN THE TERM “STUDENT ATHLETE”

Vol.2-1-Article-Stone

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One thought on “A HIDDEN TOXICITY IN THE TERM “STUDENT ATHLETE”

  1. College student athletes face certain pressures that most traditional college students do not deal with. The article focuses on understanding the nature of these pressures, examining how they affect they performance in the classroom, and finding ways to help them cope with the burdens placed on them and ensure long-term success.
    • Pressures~ negative stereotypes that faculty, traditional students and administrative personnel hold about the. The prevalent negative stereotype is that of the “dumb jock”.
    • Stereotype threat impact on scholastic performance. The degree that S-A’s are reminded of their athletic identity make the “dumb-jock” stereotype more prevalent.
    • Adding to the stereotype threat S-A reported being called “student-athletes” only activated their insecurities. They still feel their athletic identity (e.g., being labeled a student-athlete) in an academic context is sufficient to induce the stereotype threat and thus reduce their academic performance.
    Suggestions were as follows provide
    • Counter-stereotypic information about college athletes that can weaken or eliminate beliefs about dumb-jock.
    • Presentations in workshops on the psychology of stereotyping for current and new administrators, faculty and traditional students to reduce and eventually eliminate the general perception that college athletes are dumb jocks.
    • Develop programs that bolster the coping responses college athletes use when their athletic identity is brought to mind in a classroom context.
    All that was listed above was discuss during our meeting a few weeks back. I feel this is part of the pillars that are necessary to help our men and women.

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